The First Step Toward Long-Term Health Begins at Glades Medical Group

Primary Care Doctors in West Palm Beach, FL

Do you remember getting sick when you were younger? One day, you wake up, get dressed, and head off to school. You notice that your nose is stuffy. Within a few hours, your throat gets sore, and you start to feel a little off. Before you know it, you've got a full-blown cold. If you were like most children, your parents weren't perfect - but when the sniffles developed into something a little more worrisome, they knew that a trip to the family doctor would be warranted.

As adults, we need primary care doctors in West Palm Beach, FL, too - after all, most of our parents aren't around anymore. We've got to rely on ourselves to keep up with our health and the health of our families.

Primary care refers to regular healthcare services that focus on disease prevention, wellness, and health promotion. Usually, individuals who are in good health do not require frequent visits to a primary care provider. However, with annual physicals and preventative care exams, people can lower their chances of developing chronic or catastrophic health issues. These health issues can be expensive and complicated to treat, requiring hospital care and prolonged recovery, and may even lead to permanent disabilities.

Apart from making healthy lifestyle choices, such as eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, and avoiding tobacco and alcohol, getting regular health screenings is crucial in maintaining good health. Timely and appropriate screening can detect diseases early when treatment is often most effective or lifesaving.

When you need personalized, professional primary care for you and your family, look no further than Glades Medical Group.

Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL

Why Should You See a Primary Care Medical Doctor?

A primary care doctor can be the main healthcare provider for your everyday health needs. They can offer various preventive care services and be a reliable source of medical assistance. Whether you need flu testing for your child or COVID-19 testing if you think you're sick, a primary care doctor can be your go-to medical person. By having a single point of contact for most of your healthcare needs, you can enjoy the convenience and benefits of a consistent and personalized medical care experience - especially at Glade Medical Group.

Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL

Here are just a few of the biggest reasons you should visit a family medicine doctor regularly.

What is preventative care, you might be asking? This type of care comprises all the steps you take to stay healthy and avoid getting sick. In other words, it can help prevent you from contracting diseases, illnesses, and other health maladies. By seeing primary care doctors in West Palm Beach, FL, it's easier to spot and remedy health issues that might be overlooked otherwise.

In fact, according to a study conducted over a period of 10 years, primary care can have a significant impact on life expectancy. The research was led by professionals at Stanford University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School, who found that individuals with greater access to primary care were likely to live longer.

Important preventative care services to consider include:

  • Yearly Checkups for Kids & Adults
  • Childhood and Adult Vaccines, Boosters, and Flu Shots
  • Screenings for Prostate Cancer in Men
  • Screenings for Cervical Cancer in Women
  • Testing for High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Etc.

Seeing a primary care physician regularly can also help you manage long-term conditions, like diabetes, more effectively and efficiently. How? Recurring checkups help doctors monitor the conditions you're living. If new problems arise with your condition, you'll have the benefit of spotting them early and may be able to avoid serious complications or visits to the hospital.

Preventive care is an essential aspect of maintaining good health and reducing healthcare costs. Many insurance policies often cover preventive care services with no copay. Regular visits to your primary care doctor for physicals, screenings, and immunizations can help prevent costly healthcare expenses later on. However, despite the benefits of preventive care, studies show that Americans are only getting about half of the preventive care they should be receiving. In addition to better health, having a primary care physician can also lead to a 33% reduction in healthcare costs.

To illustrate, your primary care doctor may recommend a diabetes screening starting around the age of 40, depending on your overall health and risk factors. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when blood sugar levels are too high, which can cause damage to blood vessels and organs and lead to other serious health conditions.

A diabetes screening can detect prediabetes or diabetes before symptoms appear, making it easier to manage with lifestyle changes instead of expensive medications. This can also lower the risk of complications that may increase insurance premiums and lead to high out-of-pocket healthcare costs.

Many people do not feel comfortable discussing their healthcare needs and concerns with strangers. That's normal. The first step toward eliminating that discomfort is to find a trustworthy team of primary care doctors in West Palm Beach, FL who can help manage your health. Once you find a family doctor, it's important to schedule regular appointments to discuss any concerns and to monitor your overall health.

According to research conducted by the Journal of Health Affairs, patients who have primary care doctors report higher levels of satisfaction than those who do not. The more frequently you visit your trusted doctor, the stronger the relationship you will have with them, and the better your care will be.

Having a primary care doctor means having a health expert who not only cares for you but also advocates for your overall health. The relationship you build with your primary care doctor can be incredibly valuable in multiple ways. The more your doctor knows about you and understands your health history, the better they can care for you and provide guidance for your long-term health. It can also help you feel more comfortable sharing personal information and asking questions.

When it comes to asking your primary care physician, there are no limits. You can ask anything, and you should never feel embarrassed to do so. Your doctor's job is to help you stay healthy, and they have likely heard similar questions from other patients before.

Another benefit of having a primary care physician is that you won't have to start from scratch every time you see a new doctor. Your primary care physician is already familiar with your health history, so you won't have to explain everything repeatedly at every appointment.

Primary care doctors can help you save time by addressing multiple health needs in a single appointment. They can provide you with a checkup, screening, and necessary immunizations on the same day. You can also take advantage of their extensive knowledge and ask about other health-related questions you have. In some cases, you may be able to receive treatment on the same day without scheduling another appointment.

Services Provided by Glade Medical Group's Primary Care Doctors in West Palm Beach, FL

At Glade Medical Group, our goal is to provide patients with a range of medical services that address common health concerns and help them stay in optimal health. As a primary care group, we strive to offer personalized medical services. When you book an appointment with an internal medicine doctor from our group, you can rest easy knowing your care will be tailored to your body and your needs - not someone who matches your age or weight.

Keep reading to learn more about the most popular services we provide at Glade Medical Group.

Preventative Care

Many people only visit a doctor when they're unwell or require medical treatment for a specific condition. The goal of preventative care is to help you maintain your health year-round. It involves regular checkups to identify potential health issues before they become severe. Preventive care is vital in preventing serious illnesses from developing, but unfortunately, it's not as widely embraced as it should be. A study from 2018 published in Health Affairs found that only 8% of adults aged 35 or older in the US receive the recommended preventive care.

Glade Medical Group provides a number of preventative care services, including Covid shots, flu testing, and vaccines such as:

  • Hypertension
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Cardiac Disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Pain
  • Neurological Problems
  • Much More

Chronic Disease Management

It's important to prioritize your health, as it affects every aspect of your life. Disease Management can help alleviate the symptoms of existing health conditions and lower the risk of developing new ones by optimizing your overall health. Our team of healthcare professionals are experts in providing comprehensive health assessments and conducting necessary tests to identify any potential health concerns. They'll work with you to develop a plan to address any immediate or ongoing medical issues, while also keeping an eye out for any potential health risks or concerns.

Some of the chronic diseases we help treat include:

  • Hypertension
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Cardiac Disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Pain
  • Neurological Problems
  • Much More

If you're suffering from a chronic disease that needs to be treated, contact our office today to set up an initial appointment.

Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL
Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL

Same Day Lab Results

Our facility has a CLIA-certified laboratory on-site that offers comprehensive diagnostic services for our patients. In case an insurance provider requires the labs to be sent elsewhere for testing, our lab staff can collect the urine specimens or draw blood and send them to the appropriate lab on the same day. We recently upgraded to new state-of-the-art equipment, which has significantly improved our services. Patients can expect to receive their lab results within one to two days, though some specialized tests may take longer.

Our lab testing includes advanced lipid and mineral testing, as well as other specialized lab work that is drawn in-house and processed at other labs.

Male Health Services

We're living in the 21st century, and if there's one stigma that's been defeated, it's that males undergo significant hormonal changes as they get older. Our family doctors will discuss these changes with you openly and will monitor you for any underlying medical conditions that may affect your life. Factors like physical strength, weight, sexual drive, job stressors, and home life can all impact our health and should be taken into account. Genetic factors are also important to consider from a medical perspective.

Some of the key areas we focus on regarding male health includes:

  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Bone Density Treatment
  • Weight Gain
  • Loss of Muscle Mass
  • Insomnia and Fatigue
  • Low Testosterone
  • Prostate Health
  • Much More
Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL
Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL

Female Health

Everyone deserves a health maintenance plan that adapts to their changing needs as they grow and experience life. Teenage and college years have unique patterns and health requirements. Working women and young mothers, who often juggle between work and family responsibilities, are not only concerned about their own health but also about staying healthy for their loved ones. It's important to have a plan that addresses all these needs and helps maintain good health for all stages of life. That's where our female health services come in.

At Glade Medical Group, we prioritize your overall well-being by utilizing advanced medical knowledge and coordinating with other healthcare experts when needed. Some of the most common female health areas we focus on include:

  • Hormone Imbalances
  • Libido Loss
  • Adrenal Health
  • Bone Density Treatment
  • Bladder Control
  • Insomnia
  • Thyroid Testing
  • Perimenopause
  • Menopause

Aging Management

Anti-aging medicine is a proactive and preventative approach that aims to preserve your optimum function and quality of life. We achieve this by conducting thorough consultations, lifestyle assessments, physical examinations, and diagnostic testing, including genetic testing when necessary. This helps us create a personalized and proactive treatment plan designed to combat the degenerative changes that accelerate the aging process.

Anti-aging treatment plans from Glade Medical Group may include the following:

  • Hormone Balancing
  • Exercise as Therapy
  • Nutrition as Therapy
  • Medications as Necessary
  • Lifestyle Tools

Our key treatment services include the HCG Weight Loss Program, BioMeridian Assessment, a review of your Brain Health, and a Cardiology Risk Assessment. We also offer a wide range of supplements that can help slow the aging process.

Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL
Primary Care Doctors West Palm Beach, FL

Annual Physicals

Whether your child is playing sports or you're an adult in need of a thorough checkup, having an annual physical is an important part of keeping up with your health. Glade Medical Group offers physicals for school, sports, camp, college, and other needs. Patients choose our family medical practice for physicals for many reasons, including:

  • No Appointments Needed
  • Open Five days a Week with Extended Hours
  • Our Primary Care Group Maintains Required West Palm Beach, FL Forms
  • Most Health Insurance Accepted
  • Cost-Conscious Private Pay Rates

Compassionate Care and Exceptional Service from Primary Care Doctors in West Palm Beach, FL

Whether you're sick right now or you want to prevent yourself from getting sick in the future, Glade Medical Group's primary care services have you covered. Unlike some primary care providers, we take as much time as needed to get to know you, your family, and the health challenges you're facing. To us, you're much more than a number on a sign-in sheet or a name on an insurance form. You're a human in need of exceptional care - and our goal is to provide you with that care every time you visit.

Contact our office today to make an appointment or to learn more about the benefits of choosing Glade Medical Group as your team of primary care doctors in West Palm Beach, FL.

Latest News in West Palm Beach, FL

WATCH: Serena Williams gives advice to young girls at Ulta Beauty in West Palm Beach, FL

WATCH: Serena Williams gives advice to young girls at Ulta Beauty in West Palm Beach, FL

Developer tries again to build on former Carefree Theatre site in West Palm Beach

Apartments, restaurants, and spaces for indie films are in the works, but nearby El Cid historic district is pushing back. Kimberly MillerPalm Beach PostA long-mothballed plan to build apartments, restaurants and spaces for indie films at the former ...

Apartments, restaurants, and spaces for indie films are in the works, but nearby El Cid historic district is pushing back.

Kimberly Miller

Palm Beach Post

A long-mothballed plan to build apartments, restaurants and spaces for indie films at the former Carefree Theatre site in West Palm Beach is back in play as South Dixie Highway prospers post-pandemic.

New York real estate developer and lifelong cinema fan Charles Cohen bought the first parcels of what is now a combined 1.8 acres between and Flamingo and Cordova roads nearly a decade ago when the historic but hurricane-damaged Carefree was still standing.

It has since been razed, and Cohen’s proposal for the land includes two buildings, six theaters with a total of 600 seats, 58 apartments, a rooftop terrace and a two-level underground garage.

“We are very hopeful this can be done, because this is a tremendous amenity for the city as a whole,” said attorney Brian Seymour, who will represent the project at an April 16 meeting of the City of West Palm Beach’s Planning Board.

But the proposal faces pushback from the neighboring El Cid community, where century-old homes are on the front lines of COVID-triggered growth that has filled South Dixie Highway with shops, boutique grocery stores, and restaurants catering to recent transplants.

Representatives of the El Cid Historic Neighborhood Association say they are pro-development and want something built on Cohen’s vacant lots, but the current design is too tall and too big to be shoehorned onto 1.8 acres abutting a historic district.

Cohen is asking the city to waive 11 rules that include setback restrictions, open space mandates, landscape obligations and a requirement of a minimum of 5 acre for what is being proposed.

Photos:Carefree Theatre in West Palm Beach through the years

“We would love to see something responsibly developed, and we know anything will require a compromise, but we are nowhere close to having something that is compatible to being sandwiched in between two historic neighborhoods,” said Mackey Reed Shaw, the association’s co-president.

The Flamingo Park Historic District is on the west side of South Dixie Highway across from the proposed development.

City of West Palm Beach Commissioner Christina Lambert shares El Cid’s concerns, which include an increase in traffic on an already congested South Dixie Highway.

“I really think the project is too large and changes the character of the neighborhood,” said Lambert, who represents communities south of downtown. “There is definitely a resurgence along South Dixie, and we would love to see this be something that benefits the neighborhood and the city, but it needs to be contextually appropriate.”

West Palm Beach has grown rapidly since the pandemic after COVID restrictions in other states pushed a migration to Florida. Some transplants established permanent residency, enjoying the warm climate and the state’s lack of income tax.

Pandemic-triggered growing pains in West Palm Beach

The tri-county area of Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade saw the 10th highest population gain of metro areas nationwide between April 2020 and July 2023, adding about 44,000 people, according to population estimates released by the Census Bureau in March.

That overall gain included a loss of about 8,800 residents in Miami-Dade County while Palm Beach County grew by 39,520.

Statewide, Florida's population increased by more than one million between 2020 and 2023.

At the same time, New York's Related Cos., which is led by Miami Dolphins owner and Palm Beach resident Stephen Ross, began a building spree of upscale office towers and residential developments that helped lure financial firms to West Palm Beach, earning the city the nickname “Wall Street South.”

Wealth moves to Palm Beach County:West Palm and Palm Beach rank in top 5 as cities with fastest growth in millionaires

Reed Shaw moved to El Cid in 2021 and said the 100-year-old community of Mediterranean Revival and mission-style homes is experiencing a transformation that includes the addition of more young families. That’s one reason why she would like the Carefree development downsized.

“We are concerned about the crowds it will bring when we have many small children in the neighborhood now,” she said.

The current plan is already a scaled-down version from the original 2016 concept, which wanted to build to 96 feet high. In 2020, the city’s planning board approved a proposal for one building that would rise to 72 feet and another to 58 feet. That plan was withdrawn in January 2021 when the fate of movie theaters after the pandemic was uncertain.

Seymour said the plan to be presented Tuesday has had several more feet shaved off each building, although the Flamingo building, which will house the six theaters and restaurants at the corner of Flamingo Drive and South Dixie, will still be five stories tall. The Cordova building is planned for four stories.

Other changes made in the hope of wooing El Cid include a traffic design that will direct exiting cars onto Dixie Highway away from the neighborhood, the promise to hire people to control the flow of cars during peak times or special events, a reduced rooftop terrace area, a pledge of no parties or special events on the rooftop after 10 p.m., and an increase in landscaping to buffer homes from the buildings.

On the east side of the property, Seymour said they would plant 42 trees instead of the required 12. On Cordova Road, he said they are proposing 18 trees instead of the eight required. He said the developer has also committed to construction that doesn’t require the hammering of pilings into the ground that could damage fragile historic homes.

“There will be more cars on the road, and that happens with every new project,” Seymour said. “But we are trying to make this a walkable amenity.”

West Palm's old Carefree Theatre started life as an ice cream parlor

The Carefree opened in 1939 as an ice cream parlor and coin laundry. It became a theater in 1947, hosting musicians including B.B. King, Jackson Browne, Warren Zevon, Tori Amos, Los Lobos, the Neville Brothers, the Cowboy Junkies and John Mayer.

Art films were also a staple of the Carefree, as were visits from comedians, including Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock, Bill Hicks, Bill Maher and Drew Carey.

Smaller theaters geared toward art, indie and foreign films

The six screening rooms proposed for the new project will be smaller than a typical theater that shows Hollywood blockbuster films, Seymour said. Two rooms would have 50 seats, two would have 100 seats and two would have 150 seats.

Karen Steele, a former president of the El Cid Historic Neighborhood Association who has lived in the community for 37 years, said the original Carefree had its own problems with a lack of parking, and she fears a parking free-for-all with the new project.

“The concern from the beginning is why do they need theaters with 600 seats?” Steele said. “It’s too big, it’s too intrusive, it towers over everything in our community.”

Cohen, whose net worth is $3 billion according to Forbes, owns the Design Center of the Americas, an 800,000-square-foot furniture and accessories showroom in Dania Beach. His Cohen Brothers Realty Corp. also owns other design centers and office high-rises in New York, Houston and California.

The South Florida Business Journal reported this month that an affiliate of Fortress Investment Group filed a lawsuit in New York alleging Cohen had defaulted on $533.6 million in loans on several properties including the Design Center of the Americas. Seymour said he believes settlement negotiations are underway in the suit. Regardless, the legal action is unrelated to Cohen's West Palm Beach developments and will not impact them, Seymour said.

Cohen also won approval from West Palm Beach in 2022 for a 23-story office tower and 10-story parking garage on the so-called “tent site” at Okeechobee Boulevard and South Dixie Highway. South Florida Water Management District records show permitting for the project, called West Palm Point, is ongoing.

Kimberly Miller is a veteran journalist for The Palm Beach Post, part of the USA Today Network of Florida. She covers real estate and how growth affects South Florida's environment. Subscribe to The Dirt for a weekly real estate roundup. If you have news tips, please send them to kmiller@pbpost.com. Help support our local journalism, subscribe today.

Developer tries again to build on former Carefree Theatre site in West Palm Beach

Apartments, restaurants, and spaces for indie films are in the works, but nearby El Cid historic district is pushing back. Kimberly MillerPalm Beach PostA long-mothballed plan to build apartments, restaurants and spaces for indie films at the former ...

Apartments, restaurants, and spaces for indie films are in the works, but nearby El Cid historic district is pushing back.

Kimberly Miller

Palm Beach Post

A long-mothballed plan to build apartments, restaurants and spaces for indie films at the former Carefree Theatre site in West Palm Beach is back in play as South Dixie Highway prospers post-pandemic.

New York real estate developer and lifelong cinema fan Charles Cohen bought the first parcels of what is now a combined 1.8 acres between and Flamingo and Cordova roads nearly a decade ago when the historic but hurricane-damaged Carefree was still standing.

It has since been razed, and Cohen’s proposal for the land includes two buildings, six theaters with a total of 600 seats, 58 apartments, a rooftop terrace and a two-level underground garage.

“We are very hopeful this can be done, because this is a tremendous amenity for the city as a whole,” said attorney Brian Seymour, who will represent the project at an April 16 meeting of the City of West Palm Beach’s Planning Board.

But the proposal faces pushback from the neighboring El Cid community, where century-old homes are on the front lines of COVID-triggered growth that has filled South Dixie Highway with shops, boutique grocery stores, and restaurants catering to recent transplants.

Representatives of the El Cid Historic Neighborhood Association say they are pro-development and want something built on Cohen’s vacant lots, but the current design is too tall and too big to be shoehorned onto 1.8 acres abutting a historic district.

Cohen is asking the city to waive 11 rules that include setback restrictions, open space mandates, landscape obligations and a requirement of a minimum of 5 acre for what is being proposed.

Photos:Carefree Theatre in West Palm Beach through the years

“We would love to see something responsibly developed, and we know anything will require a compromise, but we are nowhere close to having something that is compatible to being sandwiched in between two historic neighborhoods,” said Mackey Reed Shaw, the association’s co-president.

The Flamingo Park Historic District is on the west side of South Dixie Highway across from the proposed development.

City of West Palm Beach Commissioner Christina Lambert shares El Cid’s concerns, which include an increase in traffic on an already congested South Dixie Highway.

“I really think the project is too large and changes the character of the neighborhood,” said Lambert, who represents communities south of downtown. “There is definitely a resurgence along South Dixie, and we would love to see this be something that benefits the neighborhood and the city, but it needs to be contextually appropriate.”

West Palm Beach has grown rapidly since the pandemic after COVID restrictions in other states pushed a migration to Florida. Some transplants established permanent residency, enjoying the warm climate and the state’s lack of income tax.

Pandemic-triggered growing pains in West Palm Beach

The tri-county area of Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade saw the 10th highest population gain of metro areas nationwide between April 2020 and July 2023, adding about 44,000 people, according to population estimates released by the Census Bureau in March.

That overall gain included a loss of about 8,800 residents in Miami-Dade County while Palm Beach County grew by 39,520.

Statewide, Florida's population increased by more than one million between 2020 and 2023.

At the same time, New York's Related Cos., which is led by Miami Dolphins owner and Palm Beach resident Stephen Ross, began a building spree of upscale office towers and residential developments that helped lure financial firms to West Palm Beach, earning the city the nickname “Wall Street South.”

Wealth moves to Palm Beach County:West Palm and Palm Beach rank in top 5 as cities with fastest growth in millionaires

Reed Shaw moved to El Cid in 2021 and said the 100-year-old community of Mediterranean Revival and mission-style homes is experiencing a transformation that includes the addition of more young families. That’s one reason why she would like the Carefree development downsized.

“We are concerned about the crowds it will bring when we have many small children in the neighborhood now,” she said.

The current plan is already a scaled-down version from the original 2016 concept, which wanted to build to 96 feet high. In 2020, the city’s planning board approved a proposal for one building that would rise to 72 feet and another to 58 feet. That plan was withdrawn in January 2021 when the fate of movie theaters after the pandemic was uncertain.

Seymour said the plan to be presented Tuesday has had several more feet shaved off each building, although the Flamingo building, which will house the six theaters and restaurants at the corner of Flamingo Drive and South Dixie, will still be five stories tall. The Cordova building is planned for four stories.

Other changes made in the hope of wooing El Cid include a traffic design that will direct exiting cars onto Dixie Highway away from the neighborhood, the promise to hire people to control the flow of cars during peak times or special events, a reduced rooftop terrace area, a pledge of no parties or special events on the rooftop after 10 p.m., and an increase in landscaping to buffer homes from the buildings.

On the east side of the property, Seymour said they would plant 42 trees instead of the required 12. On Cordova Road, he said they are proposing 18 trees instead of the eight required. He said the developer has also committed to construction that doesn’t require the hammering of pilings into the ground that could damage fragile historic homes.

“There will be more cars on the road, and that happens with every new project,” Seymour said. “But we are trying to make this a walkable amenity.”

West Palm's old Carefree Theatre started life as an ice cream parlor

The Carefree opened in 1939 as an ice cream parlor and coin laundry. It became a theater in 1947, hosting musicians including B.B. King, Jackson Browne, Warren Zevon, Tori Amos, Los Lobos, the Neville Brothers, the Cowboy Junkies and John Mayer.

Art films were also a staple of the Carefree, as were visits from comedians, including Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock, Bill Hicks, Bill Maher and Drew Carey.

Smaller theaters geared toward art, indie and foreign films

The six screening rooms proposed for the new project will be smaller than a typical theater that shows Hollywood blockbuster films, Seymour said. Two rooms would have 50 seats, two would have 100 seats and two would have 150 seats.

Karen Steele, a former president of the El Cid Historic Neighborhood Association who has lived in the community for 37 years, said the original Carefree had its own problems with a lack of parking, and she fears a parking free-for-all with the new project.

“The concern from the beginning is why do they need theaters with 600 seats?” Steele said. “It’s too big, it’s too intrusive, it towers over everything in our community.”

Cohen, whose net worth is $3 billion according to Forbes, owns the Design Center of the Americas, an 800,000-square-foot furniture and accessories showroom in Dania Beach. His Cohen Brothers Realty Corp. also owns other design centers and office high-rises in New York, Houston and California.

The South Florida Business Journal reported this month that an affiliate of Fortress Investment Group filed a lawsuit in New York alleging Cohen had defaulted on $533.6 million in loans on several properties including the Design Center of the Americas. Seymour said he believes settlement negotiations are underway in the suit. Regardless, the legal action is unrelated to Cohen's West Palm Beach developments and will not impact them, Seymour said.

Cohen also won approval from West Palm Beach in 2022 for a 23-story office tower and 10-story parking garage on the so-called “tent site” at Okeechobee Boulevard and South Dixie Highway. South Florida Water Management District records show permitting for the project, called West Palm Point, is ongoing.

Kimberly Miller is a veteran journalist for The Palm Beach Post, part of the USA Today Network of Florida. She covers real estate and how growth affects South Florida's environment. Subscribe to The Dirt for a weekly real estate roundup. If you have news tips, please send them to kmiller@pbpost.com. Help support our local journalism, subscribe today.

Historically Black neighborhood in West Palm Beach will be 'cut off' for another year

Three years after barricades went up on Tamarind Avenue, West Palm Beach officials quietly disclosed that residents of the long-ignored, historically Black neighborhood will be cut off from their main road for at least another year.The $22 million project, set to be finished in May, is only 40% complete and won’t be wrapped up until June 2025, city officials said.Leaders at the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, the downtown taxing agency that is bankrolling the “Tamarind Avenue Streetscape,” didn&rs...

Three years after barricades went up on Tamarind Avenue, West Palm Beach officials quietly disclosed that residents of the long-ignored, historically Black neighborhood will be cut off from their main road for at least another year.

The $22 million project, set to be finished in May, is only 40% complete and won’t be wrapped up until June 2025, city officials said.

Leaders at the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, the downtown taxing agency that is bankrolling the “Tamarind Avenue Streetscape,” didn’t respond to emails for comment about the 14-month delay and yearslong shutdown.

A city spokesperson, who responded to an email Stet sent to district Commissioner Christy Fox, attributed the setback to a water line break that occurred in February 2021 — a month before construction began.

Those who live or own businesses in the neighborhood that for years has been plagued by shootings, drug deals and decay welcomed the long overdue improvements, which include redesigning and repaving the road, burying utility lines and replacing a 100-year-old water line.

But, they said, the delay is emblematic of the city’s treatment of the mostly Black neighborhood.

“I am concerned because it’s holding the neighborhood hostage,” said Darren Studstill, a former NFL safety who owns Cityside Suites Smart Office and Business Cafe on Rosemary Avenue. “One year is one thing, but you’re talking about possibly five years.”

“It would never happen in El Cid,” said the Riviera Beach native, referring to the upscale, largely white neighborhood along the Intracoastal Waterway south of downtown.

Studstill and his longtime friend, lawyer Bryan Boysaw, have given a lot of thought to the future of the neighborhood. But, they said they aren’t sure others see what’s coming.

During the ground-breaking for the project, Mayor Keith James said it showed the city’s “commitment to the revitalization of the historic Northwest neighborhood.”

CRA Director Christopher Roog agreed. “This is a really intentional step toward the mayor’s vision and the CRA’s vision of creating a community of opportunity for all,” he said.

But, Boyway and Studstill said, they worry the improvements aren’t being done for the folks who live there. They are being done for those who will replace them.

“It’s prospective,” said Boysaw, who has his law office in the neighborhood.

“It’s sad that the people who live here are not going to benefit,” Studstill agreed.

They pointed across the street from their businesses at Rosemary Avenue and Fourth Street where work is beginning on the 325-unit Soleste Palm Station. Its Miami developer calls it a “luxury multifamily apartment community, located in the highly affluent and trendy West Palm Beach.”

It will join two other recently completed eight-story apartment complexes, The Grand and Flagler Station. Add to that the city’s $20 million renovation of the Sunset Lounge, an attempt to restore the supper club and concert venue to its former grandeur when Duke Ellington, James Brown and other Black artists performed.

Elisa Miller, who grew up in West Palm Beach and now lives in New Jersey, is following development in the Tamarind Avenue neighborhood. When the CRA posted a rendering of what Tamarind Avenue will look like when the streetscape is complete, she wrote: “It looks beautiful but this is definitely gentrification,” ending with a crying emoji.

Historically Black neighborhood in West Palm Beach will be 'cut off' for another year

Three years after barricades went up on Tamarind Avenue, West Palm Beach officials quietly disclosed that residents of the long-ignored, historically Black neighborhood will be cut off from their main road for at least another year.The $22 million project, set to be finished in May, is only 40% complete and won’t be wrapped up until June 2025, city officials said.Leaders at the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, the downtown taxing agency that is bankrolling the “Tamarind Avenue Streetscape,” didn&rs...

Three years after barricades went up on Tamarind Avenue, West Palm Beach officials quietly disclosed that residents of the long-ignored, historically Black neighborhood will be cut off from their main road for at least another year.

The $22 million project, set to be finished in May, is only 40% complete and won’t be wrapped up until June 2025, city officials said.

Leaders at the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, the downtown taxing agency that is bankrolling the “Tamarind Avenue Streetscape,” didn’t respond to emails for comment about the 14-month delay and yearslong shutdown.

A city spokesperson, who responded to an email Stet sent to district Commissioner Christy Fox, attributed the setback to a water line break that occurred in February 2021 — a month before construction began.

Those who live or own businesses in the neighborhood that for years has been plagued by shootings, drug deals and decay welcomed the long overdue improvements, which include redesigning and repaving the road, burying utility lines and replacing a 100-year-old water line.

But, they said, the delay is emblematic of the city’s treatment of the mostly Black neighborhood.

“I am concerned because it’s holding the neighborhood hostage,” said Darren Studstill, a former NFL safety who owns Cityside Suites Smart Office and Business Cafe on Rosemary Avenue. “One year is one thing, but you’re talking about possibly five years.”

“It would never happen in El Cid,” said the Riviera Beach native, referring to the upscale, largely white neighborhood along the Intracoastal Waterway south of downtown.

Studstill and his longtime friend, lawyer Bryan Boysaw, have given a lot of thought to the future of the neighborhood. But, they said they aren’t sure others see what’s coming.

During the ground-breaking for the project, Mayor Keith James said it showed the city’s “commitment to the revitalization of the historic Northwest neighborhood.”

CRA Director Christopher Roog agreed. “This is a really intentional step toward the mayor’s vision and the CRA’s vision of creating a community of opportunity for all,” he said.

But, Boyway and Studstill said, they worry the improvements aren’t being done for the folks who live there. They are being done for those who will replace them.

“It’s prospective,” said Boysaw, who has his law office in the neighborhood.

“It’s sad that the people who live here are not going to benefit,” Studstill agreed.

They pointed across the street from their businesses at Rosemary Avenue and Fourth Street where work is beginning on the 325-unit Soleste Palm Station. Its Miami developer calls it a “luxury multifamily apartment community, located in the highly affluent and trendy West Palm Beach.”

It will join two other recently completed eight-story apartment complexes, The Grand and Flagler Station. Add to that the city’s $20 million renovation of the Sunset Lounge, an attempt to restore the supper club and concert venue to its former grandeur when Duke Ellington, James Brown and other Black artists performed.

Elisa Miller, who grew up in West Palm Beach and now lives in New Jersey, is following development in the Tamarind Avenue neighborhood. When the CRA posted a rendering of what Tamarind Avenue will look like when the streetscape is complete, she wrote: “It looks beautiful but this is definitely gentrification,” ending with a crying emoji.

West Palm Beach residents to city: We still don't want a marina

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. —A few dozen people showed up to West Palm Beach’s first presentation by a consultant hired to study the downtown waterfront, held Thursday night at Cacti Park."The presentation was, in essence, to give the residents some idea how we can potentially activate the waterfront," said city director of housing and community development Jennifer Ferriol.For some in the audience, though, “activate” means figuring out a new way to develop a marina that the p...

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. —

A few dozen people showed up to West Palm Beach’s first presentation by a consultant hired to study the downtown waterfront, held Thursday night at Cacti Park.

"The presentation was, in essence, to give the residents some idea how we can potentially activate the waterfront," said city director of housing and community development Jennifer Ferriol.

For some in the audience, though, “activate” means figuring out a new way to develop a marina that the public overwhelmingly objected to last year.

West Palm Beach survey shows people don't want downtown marina on public waterfront

“What you’re doing is never going to happen. We’re going to get a marina. That’s what the city wants," said one man in the audience during the question segment.

Consultant Tony Garcia of Street Plans says that’s not why he was hired.

“I’m not here to rubber stamp a marina," Garcia said.

Garcia said the city’s online survey included a question about having a marina and the answer so far was a resounding "no."

"One question was 'Do you support having a marina?' And it was like 80-90 percent said no," Garcia told the crowd.

Garcia also took an instant survey from the audience using a QR code, with questions like, "What word describes what you love about the West Palm Beach waterfront?"

The answers showed up immediately on the TV screen: words such as "beautiful, free, peaceful and natural."

“We’re unique, and I want it to remain unique and tranquil," said longtime South End resident Alan Levine after the meeting.

Levine says he is still suspicious the city wants the marina regardless.

"I think this is an attempt to get the record straight, and then the politicians will do what they always do: what they want," Levine said.

West Palm Beach commissioners react to outpouring of opposition to downtown marina vote

The developer of the original marina proposal, Ray Graziotto of City Harbor, was in the back row, but left before the end of the meeting and before Investigative Reporter Terri Parker could ask him if he is still pushing that plan.

“Nothing is precooked — we’re just here to get feedback from our residents," Ferriol said.

Ferriol said they will have more meetings, more feedback and take it all into consideration before presenting to the city council.

Downtown Neighborhood Association Vice President Rick Rose, who was instrumental in halting the original marina project, said he doesn't sense any ulterior motive by the city so far.

West Palm Beach commissioners terminate marina project

“At this point, I’m optimistic, and maybe we can even improve the waterfront," Rose said.

For more information on upcoming meetings and events, go to the city's website, "Your Waterfront, Your Way."

Stay up-to-date: The latest headlines and weather from WPBF 25

Get the latest news updates with the WPBF 25 News app. You can download it here.

West Palm Beach residents to city: We still don't want a marina

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. —A few dozen people showed up to West Palm Beach’s first presentation by a consultant hired to study the downtown waterfront, held Thursday night at Cacti Park."The presentation was, in essence, to give the residents some idea how we can potentially activate the waterfront," said city director of housing and community development Jennifer Ferriol.For some in the audience, though, “activate” means figuring out a new way to develop a marina that the p...

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. —

A few dozen people showed up to West Palm Beach’s first presentation by a consultant hired to study the downtown waterfront, held Thursday night at Cacti Park.

"The presentation was, in essence, to give the residents some idea how we can potentially activate the waterfront," said city director of housing and community development Jennifer Ferriol.

For some in the audience, though, “activate” means figuring out a new way to develop a marina that the public overwhelmingly objected to last year.

West Palm Beach survey shows people don't want downtown marina on public waterfront

“What you’re doing is never going to happen. We’re going to get a marina. That’s what the city wants," said one man in the audience during the question segment.

Consultant Tony Garcia of Street Plans says that’s not why he was hired.

“I’m not here to rubber stamp a marina," Garcia said.

Garcia said the city’s online survey included a question about having a marina and the answer so far was a resounding "no."

"One question was 'Do you support having a marina?' And it was like 80-90 percent said no," Garcia told the crowd.

Garcia also took an instant survey from the audience using a QR code, with questions like, "What word describes what you love about the West Palm Beach waterfront?"

The answers showed up immediately on the TV screen: words such as "beautiful, free, peaceful and natural."

“We’re unique, and I want it to remain unique and tranquil," said longtime South End resident Alan Levine after the meeting.

Levine says he is still suspicious the city wants the marina regardless.

"I think this is an attempt to get the record straight, and then the politicians will do what they always do: what they want," Levine said.

West Palm Beach commissioners react to outpouring of opposition to downtown marina vote

The developer of the original marina proposal, Ray Graziotto of City Harbor, was in the back row, but left before the end of the meeting and before Investigative Reporter Terri Parker could ask him if he is still pushing that plan.

“Nothing is precooked — we’re just here to get feedback from our residents," Ferriol said.

Ferriol said they will have more meetings, more feedback and take it all into consideration before presenting to the city council.

Downtown Neighborhood Association Vice President Rick Rose, who was instrumental in halting the original marina project, said he doesn't sense any ulterior motive by the city so far.

West Palm Beach commissioners terminate marina project

“At this point, I’m optimistic, and maybe we can even improve the waterfront," Rose said.

For more information on upcoming meetings and events, go to the city's website, "Your Waterfront, Your Way."

Stay up-to-date: The latest headlines and weather from WPBF 25

Get the latest news updates with the WPBF 25 News app. You can download it here.

Passover dining: Local restaurants offer dine-in, takeout holiday meals

Passover dining options at Palm Beach County restaurants are plentiful this year, and they range from prix fixe menus to a la carte specials to takeout meals.Local menus feature chicken liver starters, brisket, roast chicken and salmon preparations, fresh salads and tzimmes and flourless desserts. You can find them and more at favorite local delis, bistros and more upscale restaurants, located from Boca Raton to suburban Delray Beach to Palm Beach to West Palm Beach and other cities.Here’s what’s on the menu for Pas...

Passover dining options at Palm Beach County restaurants are plentiful this year, and they range from prix fixe menus to a la carte specials to takeout meals.

Local menus feature chicken liver starters, brisket, roast chicken and salmon preparations, fresh salads and tzimmes and flourless desserts. You can find them and more at favorite local delis, bistros and more upscale restaurants, located from Boca Raton to suburban Delray Beach to Palm Beach to West Palm Beach and other cities.

Here’s what’s on the menu for Passover, which starts Monday, April 22, before sundown and ends on the night of April 30.

Ben’s Kosher Deli

During the eight days of Passover, this go-to Jewish deli in suburban Boca Raton will be closed. But before it closes for the holidays at 4 p.m. April 22, Ben’s will offer a catered, full Passover dinner that serves six to 10 people.

The spread, priced at $259.90 for six and $399.90 for 10, includes chopped liver and gefilte fish starters, chicken and matzo ball soup, a choice of one entree (roast chicken, sliced brisket or turkey), a choice of two sides (such as sweet potato pudding and broccoli almondine), plus homemade gravy, carrot tzimmes, coleslaw, cranberry-pineapple compote and a relish tray.

There’s also a Passover ceremonial plate, priced at $17.99.

To qualify for Ben’s rewards, orders must be placed by Tuesday, April 16, but non-rewards orders will be accepted after that. Ben’s will reopen May 1.

Ben’s Kosher Deli: 9942 Clint Moore Rd., Boca Raton, 561-470-9963,BensDeli.net

Max’s Grille

This Mizner Park mainstay restaurant is offering a la carte Passover dinner specials on April 22-23 after 4 p.m.

On the menu: apple-walnut salad with honey dressing ($15), matzo ball soup ($11), slow-roasted beef brisket with carrots, prunes, herb-roasted new potatoes and green beans and shallots ($34), a half chicken with lemony broccoli and new potatoes ($29), baked salmon with zucchini and carrot quinoa, braised cabbage and horseradish-dill sauce ($37), and for dessert, flourless chocolate cake ($13) and lemon-almond macaroons ($11).

Max’s Grille: 404 Plaza Real at Mizner Park, Boca Raton, 561-368-0080,MaxsGrille.com

Chez Marie

How about a bistro-style Passover meal? Chez Marie French Bistro in Boca Raton is serving a special three-course menu on April 22-23, priced at $65 per person.

On the holiday menu: For starters, there’s a choice of truffled duck liver mousse, matzo ball soup or apple-walnut salad. Main dish options include rosemary-seasoned lamb shank au jus, beef brisket in an onion and sweet tomato sauce, herb-roasted chicken and honey and mustard-glazed salmon. Those entrees come with caramelized carrots, garlic green beans and garlic-roasted potatoes. For dessert, options include apple crumble, lavender crème brulée and chocolate mousse. The holiday menu includes a Passover Seder plate and matzo.

The bistro’s regular a la carte menu will not be offered on either night.

Chez Marie: 5030 Champion Blvd., Suite #D3, Boca Raton, 561-997-0027,ChezMarieFrenchBistro.com

Burt & Max’s

This go-to, suburban Delray Beach restaurant — a sibling of Max’s Grille in Boca — will serve classic Passover a la carte specials on April 22-23 after 4 p.m.

On the menu: Starters include chopped chicken liver ($12), apples-and-honey salad ($11) and matzo ball soup ($9). Main plates include pan-roasted salmon ($30), slow-roasted brisket ($32) with potato pancakes and a roasted half chicken ($25). For dessert, there’s chocolate-coconut macaroons ($8).

Burt & Max’s: 9089 W. Atlantic Ave., in the Delray Marketplace, 561-638-6380,BurtandMaxs.com

Café Boulud

Michelin-starred chef Daniel Boulud’s Palm Beach restaurant is serving a three-course, prix-fixe Passover menu on April 22-23.

Dinner begins with a choice of starter (options include Balik-style smoked salmon and house-made chicken terrine), continues with a choice of main plate (such as Florida pompano with fennel, tomato and citrus and beef brisket with heirloom carrots, Swiss chard and hazelnuts), includes family-style side dishes and wraps up with a choice of dessert (such as pavlova with passion fruit-mango sorbet and meringue and flourless chocolate cake with raspberry sorbet).

The holiday dinner, served from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, is priced at $135 per person, $65 per child younger than 10. The prix-fixe menu is required for the entire table. Reservations are required and accepted at CafeBoulud.com/palmbeach.

Café Boulud: 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach, 561-655-6060

Almond

Palm Beach’s Almond bistro is offering a couple of holiday specials on the Passover Seder nights of April 22-23.

As a starter, there will be matzo ball soup. Served family-style or individually portioned, the main plate special is Sephardic-style, wine-braised Florida brisket with dried apricots, Holman’s Harvest farm baby carrots with dill ($44 per person).

Almond: 207 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, 561-355-5080,AlmondRestaurant.com

TooJay’s

This West Palm Beach-based deli chain is offering a prix-fixe dine-in and takeout menu for Passover on April 22-23.

The holiday menu, priced at $29.99 per person, starts with matzo ball soup and a choice of gefilte fish or chopped liver. For the main plate, there’s a choice of beef brisket, roasted half chicken or baked salmon with dill hollandaise. Included sides are carrot tzimmes and potato pancakes. Dessert is three iced or plain macaroons.

The meal comes with coffee or tea. Dine-in customers also get a glass of Kosher wine.

TooJay’s: The deli chain has eight locations in Palm Beach County, from Jupiter to Wellington to Boca Raton. To find one near you, visitTooJays.com.

Read recent columns by Liz Balmaseda

New West Palm steakhouse restaurant kicks off Sunday brunch

A favorite seafood restaurant gets a glow-up in the Gardens

New oceanfront bar opens, 2 others named ‘best’ in The South

3 new pizzerias to put on your radar

Where to find the best meatballs in town? Some favorites!

5 new restaurants to get excited about in Palm Beach County

Mexican restaurant gets new look, Food Network contestant chef

Liz Balmaseda is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for The Palm Beach Post, part of the USA Today Network. She covers the local food and dining beat. Follow her on Instagram and Post on Food Facebook. She can be reached by email at lbalmaseda@pbpost.com.

Passover dining: Local restaurants offer dine-in, takeout holiday meals

Passover dining options at Palm Beach County restaurants are plentiful this year, and they range from prix fixe menus to a la carte specials to takeout meals.Local menus feature chicken liver starters, brisket, roast chicken and salmon preparations, fresh salads and tzimmes and flourless desserts. You can find them and more at favorite local delis, bistros and more upscale restaurants, located from Boca Raton to suburban Delray Beach to Palm Beach to West Palm Beach and other cities.Here’s what’s on the menu for Pas...

Passover dining options at Palm Beach County restaurants are plentiful this year, and they range from prix fixe menus to a la carte specials to takeout meals.

Local menus feature chicken liver starters, brisket, roast chicken and salmon preparations, fresh salads and tzimmes and flourless desserts. You can find them and more at favorite local delis, bistros and more upscale restaurants, located from Boca Raton to suburban Delray Beach to Palm Beach to West Palm Beach and other cities.

Here’s what’s on the menu for Passover, which starts Monday, April 22, before sundown and ends on the night of April 30.

Ben’s Kosher Deli

During the eight days of Passover, this go-to Jewish deli in suburban Boca Raton will be closed. But before it closes for the holidays at 4 p.m. April 22, Ben’s will offer a catered, full Passover dinner that serves six to 10 people.

The spread, priced at $259.90 for six and $399.90 for 10, includes chopped liver and gefilte fish starters, chicken and matzo ball soup, a choice of one entree (roast chicken, sliced brisket or turkey), a choice of two sides (such as sweet potato pudding and broccoli almondine), plus homemade gravy, carrot tzimmes, coleslaw, cranberry-pineapple compote and a relish tray.

There’s also a Passover ceremonial plate, priced at $17.99.

To qualify for Ben’s rewards, orders must be placed by Tuesday, April 16, but non-rewards orders will be accepted after that. Ben’s will reopen May 1.

Ben’s Kosher Deli: 9942 Clint Moore Rd., Boca Raton, 561-470-9963,BensDeli.net

Max’s Grille

This Mizner Park mainstay restaurant is offering a la carte Passover dinner specials on April 22-23 after 4 p.m.

On the menu: apple-walnut salad with honey dressing ($15), matzo ball soup ($11), slow-roasted beef brisket with carrots, prunes, herb-roasted new potatoes and green beans and shallots ($34), a half chicken with lemony broccoli and new potatoes ($29), baked salmon with zucchini and carrot quinoa, braised cabbage and horseradish-dill sauce ($37), and for dessert, flourless chocolate cake ($13) and lemon-almond macaroons ($11).

Max’s Grille: 404 Plaza Real at Mizner Park, Boca Raton, 561-368-0080,MaxsGrille.com

Chez Marie

How about a bistro-style Passover meal? Chez Marie French Bistro in Boca Raton is serving a special three-course menu on April 22-23, priced at $65 per person.

On the holiday menu: For starters, there’s a choice of truffled duck liver mousse, matzo ball soup or apple-walnut salad. Main dish options include rosemary-seasoned lamb shank au jus, beef brisket in an onion and sweet tomato sauce, herb-roasted chicken and honey and mustard-glazed salmon. Those entrees come with caramelized carrots, garlic green beans and garlic-roasted potatoes. For dessert, options include apple crumble, lavender crème brulée and chocolate mousse. The holiday menu includes a Passover Seder plate and matzo.

The bistro’s regular a la carte menu will not be offered on either night.

Chez Marie: 5030 Champion Blvd., Suite #D3, Boca Raton, 561-997-0027,ChezMarieFrenchBistro.com

Burt & Max’s

This go-to, suburban Delray Beach restaurant — a sibling of Max’s Grille in Boca — will serve classic Passover a la carte specials on April 22-23 after 4 p.m.

On the menu: Starters include chopped chicken liver ($12), apples-and-honey salad ($11) and matzo ball soup ($9). Main plates include pan-roasted salmon ($30), slow-roasted brisket ($32) with potato pancakes and a roasted half chicken ($25). For dessert, there’s chocolate-coconut macaroons ($8).

Burt & Max’s: 9089 W. Atlantic Ave., in the Delray Marketplace, 561-638-6380,BurtandMaxs.com

Café Boulud

Michelin-starred chef Daniel Boulud’s Palm Beach restaurant is serving a three-course, prix-fixe Passover menu on April 22-23.

Dinner begins with a choice of starter (options include Balik-style smoked salmon and house-made chicken terrine), continues with a choice of main plate (such as Florida pompano with fennel, tomato and citrus and beef brisket with heirloom carrots, Swiss chard and hazelnuts), includes family-style side dishes and wraps up with a choice of dessert (such as pavlova with passion fruit-mango sorbet and meringue and flourless chocolate cake with raspberry sorbet).

The holiday dinner, served from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, is priced at $135 per person, $65 per child younger than 10. The prix-fixe menu is required for the entire table. Reservations are required and accepted at CafeBoulud.com/palmbeach.

Café Boulud: 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach, 561-655-6060

Almond

Palm Beach’s Almond bistro is offering a couple of holiday specials on the Passover Seder nights of April 22-23.

As a starter, there will be matzo ball soup. Served family-style or individually portioned, the main plate special is Sephardic-style, wine-braised Florida brisket with dried apricots, Holman’s Harvest farm baby carrots with dill ($44 per person).

Almond: 207 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, 561-355-5080,AlmondRestaurant.com

TooJay’s

This West Palm Beach-based deli chain is offering a prix-fixe dine-in and takeout menu for Passover on April 22-23.

The holiday menu, priced at $29.99 per person, starts with matzo ball soup and a choice of gefilte fish or chopped liver. For the main plate, there’s a choice of beef brisket, roasted half chicken or baked salmon with dill hollandaise. Included sides are carrot tzimmes and potato pancakes. Dessert is three iced or plain macaroons.

The meal comes with coffee or tea. Dine-in customers also get a glass of Kosher wine.

TooJay’s: The deli chain has eight locations in Palm Beach County, from Jupiter to Wellington to Boca Raton. To find one near you, visitTooJays.com.

Read recent columns by Liz Balmaseda

New West Palm steakhouse restaurant kicks off Sunday brunch

A favorite seafood restaurant gets a glow-up in the Gardens

New oceanfront bar opens, 2 others named ‘best’ in The South

3 new pizzerias to put on your radar

Where to find the best meatballs in town? Some favorites!

5 new restaurants to get excited about in Palm Beach County

Mexican restaurant gets new look, Food Network contestant chef

Liz Balmaseda is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for The Palm Beach Post, part of the USA Today Network. She covers the local food and dining beat. Follow her on Instagram and Post on Food Facebook. She can be reached by email at lbalmaseda@pbpost.com.

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